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About 10% of Brazilian children suffer from migraine

About 10% of Brazilian children suffer from migraine

Is your child's school performance dropping over time? The problem may not be due to lack of dedication, but to migraine. A study involving 5,671 participants aged 5 to 12 found that about 10% of Brazilian children suffer from this type of headache, which is related to difficulties in school and even involves emotional issues. The survey, published in the October issue of the scientific journal Neurology , evaluated individuals from 18 states and 87 Brazilian cities.

The survey was done by the Glia Institute of Cognition and Development and presented at the 26th Brazilian Congress of Headache, which happened in Rio de Janeiro, in the month of September. This was the first study to evaluate the prevalence of childhood migraine in the country.

The families interviewed for the study responded to a scientifically validated questionnaire, and the teachers reported the school performance of these children. The data revealed that only 17.9% of them never complained of headaches. Of the 7.9% who had migraines, 0.6% were victims of the chronic form of the disease, characterized by pain in more than 15 days per month.

The study pointed out that in the migraine population, the risk of to pay attention in class, for example, is 2.8 times higher than among children who do not suffer from the problem. The chance of below-average performance, in turn, is 32.5% higher among those with episodic migraine and 37.51% higher among those suffering from chronic migraine. According to the neurologist Ricardo Teixeira, a member of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology, he said that the risk of developing depression and anxiety is 5.8 times higher among children with this type of headache.

infant migraine may have symptoms that go well beyond headache. "Nausea, vomiting, the urge to sleep and abdominal pain are other characteristics of this type of headache," he says. In some cases, there is also the phenomenon known as 'aura', where the child loses strength or suffers changes in the sensitivity of one side of the body soon after the headache.

Treatment may include the use of medications, but above all the change of some habits, since the problem may be related to lack of sleep, change in temperature and even diet. Selenium is a mineral capable of removing toxic metals from the body, which contribute to the increase of free radicals in the body, which can cause symptoms of migraine. It can be found in salmon, raw oysters and Brazil nuts.

Magnesium

Magnesium has a relaxing action, which can ease headaches due to stress, anxiety and PMS. It is present in cashew nuts, almonds and pistachios.

Omega 3

Omega 3 acts as an anti-inflammatory in the body, preventing the action of substances that promote dilation of the vessels, causing headache . Rich sources of this fat are salmon, sardines and tuna.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is essential for the functioning of the nervous system, as it prevents changes in sensitivity in the body that can trigger migraine. Consume vitamin B12 by eating beef liver, shellfish and eggs.


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