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Increased tonsils are a major risk factor for sleep disorders in children

Increased tonsils are a major risk factor for sleep disorders in children

A study by the Institute of Biomedicine at the University of Eastern Finland found that obesity and other weight-related factors are not related to the presence of Sleep Respiratory Disorders (DRS) in children . The research is part of a larger study, called Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (Panic, acronym in English). The results were published in the December issue of the European Journal of Pediatrics . The authors followed 512 Finnish children aged six to eight years. Approximately 10% of them presented some form of respiratory disorder during sleep, ranging from moderate snoring to obstructive sleep apnea. Other symptoms outside the sleep period were also observed, such as hyperactivity, learning difficulties and growth problems. Analyzing the results, the researchers found that the main factor for sleep disorders in children was the presence of enlarged tonsils - the risk was 3.7 times higher in this condition. The other factors were crossbite (a picture in which the upper arch teeth overlap the teeth of the lower arch), with a 3.3-fold increased risk, and convex facial profile (characterized by the small chin), with an increased risk of 2, 6 times.

For researchers, the discovery of these risk factors allows interventions to prevent the onset of the disease in childhood. They claim that obesity contributes to the severity of this condition in adulthood and therefore should continue to be seen with attention in children.

Simple Habits Prevent Childhood Obesity

Although risk factors for sleep disorders uncontrolled weight gain in childhood may contribute to the worsening of disorders and even the emergence of other diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Here are the habits that help your child eat healthier foods by reducing the chances of developing childhood obesity:

Fractions

The child should eat five or six meals (breakfast, morning snack, lunch, afternoon snack, dinner and supper) at appropriate locations and pre-set times. Help make split meals a routine for your child by reducing the volume of food eaten at main meals.

Can candy be on the menu?

Delicacies should not be banned, but offered in controlled portions, for example. example, a small package with three filled biscuits. Do not forget to leave the candy in the child's reach. Avoid excessive consumption of snack foods, fritters, soft drinks, sweets, and sweets in general, limiting their use to a maximum of once a week.

Include salad

Encourage the use of raw salads. To make it more attractive add additives like kani kama, tuna or lean cheeses. A good tip is to put together a variety of salty and colorful dishes, that is, appealing to children.

Offer juice

Replace soft drinks with natural juices and do not let the liquid intake from your meals, greater than 250 ml. Try not to sweeten juices, let your child make the habit of not needing this unhealthy juice supplement.

Praise

Praise your child to realize that he is taking his new way of eating seriously. Also offer prizes for each new achievement (but the prize can not be linked to food).


Fish consumption helps fight asthma in children

Fish consumption helps fight asthma in children

The survey included responses from 4,171 randomly selected families who answered questionnaires when their children were six months, 12 months, and four and a half years old. We examined children who had three or more episodes of wheezing in the past year. This group was compared to children who did not have episodes of wheezing.

(Family)

Excessive physical exercise can harm adolescents

Excessive physical exercise can harm adolescents

Adolescence is a key period for acquiring bone mass. In adolescent athletes, the peak bone mass may present a greater increase, due to the mechanical stress imposed to the bones by the physical exercise practiced. There is consistent research confirming that moderate physical activity with weight support, such as running and jumping, has a more positive impact on bone deposition (bone quality) than activities that do not require weight support, such as swimming.

(Family)