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Drop this pacifier! Saliva harbor caries-causing bacteria, says ADA response to pacifier study

Drop this pacifier! Saliva harbor caries-causing bacteria, says ADA response to pacifier study

Stop there, says the American Dental Association

Licking a pacifier can transmit the caries-causing bacteria from parents to their children - increasing the likelihood of dental caries when children grow up.

The ADA published a statement May 6 in response to a study on the immunological benefits of adult saliva recently published in Pediatrics, a journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. The study "does not show the full picture that adult saliva can also contain bacteria that cause caries," says the ADA.

"The child's teeth are susceptible to decay as they begin to erupt," says Dr. Jonathan Shenkin, a pediatric dentist from Maine and an ADA spokeswoman. "Caries-causing bacteria, especially Streptococcus mutans, can be transferred from adult saliva to children, increasing the risk of developing caries."

The sharing of household utensils with a baby, or taking the pacifier to the mouth to clean it, can also increase the probability of transmission of caries-causing bacteria. There are other measures parents can take to help children develop the immune system, Dr. Shenkin adds. "Breast milk is highly recognized as a good builder of immunity and also the most complete form of nutrition for infants, he says. "This is a fact that the ADA and the AAP agree on."

ADA recommends that parents protect their babies' oral health by promoting a healthy diet by monitoring their food and drink intake, brushing their teeth and cleaning their teeth. gums after meals and having the children finish the bottle before going to bed. The ADA recommends that children first consult with the dentist up to six months after the eruption of the first tooth and before the age of one.


Bride relerende to walk to dance at her wedding

Bride relerende to walk to dance at her wedding

Love can motivate many changes, even those said impossible by medicine. An example of this is the case of the American photographer Jaquie Goncher, 25 years old. In 2008, she suffered a spinal injury after an unsuccessful jump in the pool, which left her paralyzed from the neck down. The doctors said she would not have a chance to recover, but Jaquie did not accept the sentence and decided to devote herself physiotherapy and the academy for years.

(Family)

Pre-gestational obesity increases chances of asthma in adolescence

Pre-gestational obesity increases chances of asthma in adolescence

A study published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health found that children of women who were overweight or obese when they became pregnant may be more likely to develop asthma in adolescence. The study looked at the respiratory health of about 7,000 15- and 16-year-olds born in northern Finland between July 1985 and June 1986.

(Family)