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Musician plays saxophone during brain surgery

Musician plays saxophone during brain surgery

Inspiring stories emerge each day and enable us to see the world with different eyes. The professional musician and music teacher, Dan Fabbio, discovered having a tumor located precisely in the part of the brain responsible for musical activities, this means that his withdrawal could compromise his work and passion forever.

Then he decided that he would not go give up her dream and so began a long journey with the help of a team of doctors, scientists, and even a music professor at the University of Rochester in the United States to remove the tumor from her head. Brain tumors can have significant consequences depending on their location. Both the tumor itself and the operation to remove it can cause tissue damage and compromise communication between different parts of the brain, "said his neurosurgeon Web Pilcher of the University of Rochester , in an article published by the website Futurity.org.

In order to reduce the damages caused in surgeries, the researchers Web Pilcher and Brad M ahon developed a brain mapping program for patients who had to undergo a procedure to remove tumors and control seizures. "It is therefore crucial to understand as much as possible about each patient before bringing them into the room. operations so we can perform the procedure without causing damage to parts of the brain that are important to the life and function of that person, "Pilcher commented.

According to Brad Mahon, everyone's brain is organized more or less same way, but the particular location of certain functions can vary a few centimeters from one person to another, so it is essential that custom mapping exist.

In addition, the team has created various cognitive tests for Dan Fabbio to be able to respond while doctors were examining his brain. During MRI, they placed a song and the patient should repeat the melody. Researchers also did tests involving identifying objects and repeating phrases.

Using this information, they created a highly detailed 3D map that would be used to guide surgeons in the procedure. However, surgery had another innovative method. Throughout the procedure, Fabbio was awake and playing the saxophone so that they could test whether his skills would remain intact. He again had to hum the tunes played in the operating room, but this time his brain was exposed. However, some care had to be taken so that he did not make too much force, so he had to play a song that allowed for short breaths.

During the surgery, Dan was lying slightly on his left side. "That position is not what you would play a saxophone, so we had to be creative to make it work. I had no movement and freedom with my fingers in both hands, it was such a strange angle. But it worked, the patient revealed.

After removing the tumor completely, the doctors asked him to take the saxophone and play a song. "He played perfectly," recalls music cognition expert Elizabeth Marvin, who was also in the process.

One year after surgery, Dan continues to play and teach music. And you feel that your musical talents are as good as the procedure before. The data from Dan Fabbio's case helped to define more accurately the relationship between the different parts of the brain that are responsible for music and language processing.

The technique is already used in various parts of the world, allowing the surgeon to do the stimulation of the brain identifying the areas called eloquent, the region with the function for motor and speech. In this way, doctors are able to know which areas of the brain should be kept untouched during the surgical process and from where they can remove the tumor.The patient's agreed-upon method aims to preserve functions so that he can have a quality of life after surgery, decreasing the chances of sequelae.

Check out the video below for a 7-minute documentary on this procedure:

Musician plays the saxophone during brain surgery


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