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New contraceptive pills increase clotting risk

New contraceptive pills increase clotting risk

Clotting in the blood is a side effect of well known birth control pills. Now, a study published in the online version of the British Medicine Journal has revealed that women who take birth control pills recently launched on the market seem to be even more likely to form dangerous clots in their veins than those who follow "The research, conducted by scientists at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, was based on a 15-year analysis of the medical data of all women in the country aged 15-49 who presented records of hospitalization, death and prescription of medications. In total, more than eight million women were evaluated. About 30% reported never having taken pills and 70% reported having used the drug.

Among the group, there were 4,307 cases of clots that required medical intervention, 64% of them due to deep venous thrombosis. The results showed that for every 10,000 women who did not use any hormonal birth control, 3.7 would have a blood clot over a period of one year. Among those who had used pills for a long time in the market, the proportion was 7.5 per 10 thousand women. Finally, supporters of newly launched pills showed, on average, 10 cases of clotting per 10,000 women in the same period. The danger of clot formation is its passage into organ veins as brain and lung, which can cause stroke and lead to death. Therefore, researchers warn that it is essential to consult a physician before changing the method of birth control. Pill may lower risk of ovarian cancer

In contrast, a study published in the

British Journal of Cancer

revealed that women who take the contraceptive pill are less likely to develop ovarian cancer than those who do not. The analysis was led by researchers at the

Northern Institute for Cancer Research

, at University of Newcastle in the United Kingdom. More than 300,000 women participating in a large European study called European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC), were studied in this experiment. The results showed that every 100,000 women who took the pill for about 10 years had fewer than 12 cases of ovarian cancer. However, it has also been found that by keeping up the proportion, there have been 50 new cases of breast cancer. Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer in women in the UK, with more than 6,500 cases diagnosed per year. Some of the risk factors for developing the disease are age, failure in certain genes, obesity, and smoking.

According to an epidemiologist at the Cancer Research UK , at the University of Oxford

ovarian cancer is difficult to detect. Thus, with this discovery, the use of the pill gains more incentive.


Researcher seeks to prevent the migration of harmful oral bacteria

Researcher seeks to prevent the migration of harmful oral bacteria

Researchers have mouth bacteria in sight as they look for new ways to neutralize a common bacterium that is harmless in the mother's mouth but can become deadly by reaching a baby before birth. Yiping Han, Ph.D., associate professor at the Faculty of Dentistry at Case Western Reserve University, seeks to build obstacles to block the migration of bacteria known as Fusobacterium nucleatum; Dr.

(Health)

Unicamp finds 'antivirus' for mosquito Aedes Aegypti

Unicamp finds 'antivirus' for mosquito Aedes Aegypti

A work done by Unicamp - University of Campinas Unicamp was able to detect exactly which are the mosquito Aedes aegypti cells that carry the zika virus. This discovery could help create new ways to fight the disease and reduce the contagion of zika, dengue and chikungunya. The research found 13 lipids that act as biomarkers of the infection caused by zika virus, that is, they point out the path that the virus must follow inside the cell .

(Health)