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Repeating nightmares indicate that something may be missing in your life

Repeating nightmares indicate that something may be missing in your life

The experience of having nightmares can be unpleasant. Now imagine having the same nightmare night after night. It is a stressful situation, and may even decrease our desire to go to sleep. Netta Weinstein, a senior psychology professor at the University of Cardiff in the UK, has developed a study published in the journal Motivation and Emotion, which indicated that people who felt frustrated and powerless in their lives were more likely to have recurring nightmares than those who felt satisfied and in control of their routines.

Three primary characteristics for well-being were taken into account in the study: Autonomy, competence and affinity with the social environment. The goal was to know if there was a relationship between their lack and disturbing dreams. Usually, people feel more satisfied with their lives when they are in control of their choices, if they are good at what they do and feel connected to each other without the occurrence of isolation. The absence of these aspects in life can lead to anxiety, depression, and other mental problems.

How the study was done

200 people were asked to respond to a questionnaire about how frustrated or satisfied they were with various aspects of their lives , informing also what was his most recurrent dream. It was also asked in parallel that another 110 participants would maintain a sort of "dream journal" and respond to psychological questionnaires for three days.

Both experiments showed a link between frustrations and negative-themed dreams involving feelings of dread, sadness or rage. "This may be the psyche trying to process and make sense of the challenging experiences we have when we're awake," Weinstein said in an interview with Time magazine.

The first experiment

People who in the first survey answered that they were frustrated with their routines , reported that they often dreamed that they were falling, missing something, or being attacked. However, the authors involved in the research warn: It is still too early to relate a specific dream to a day-to-day problem. But the studies already show clues that specific negative feelings are able to influence in our dreams.

The second experiment

The second group that was followed for three days reported that they had much worse dreams on days when they experienced some frustration. On days when it did not occur, or happened in smaller amounts, the dreams were more "light". This strengthens the idea that day-to-day unfulfilled expectations are directly influencing dreams.

Conclusions

Weinstein says his research raises more points to be discussed around mental health, and should serve as a warning to people who find themselves daily in conditions of loneliness, frustration and helplessness. "Frequent negative emotions, when left untreated, affect not only our functioning during the day but now, possibly, affect our ability to sleep well at night and rest."

Therefore, it is important to be aware of your feelings. If you feel in a situation of constant malaise, seek the help of people close to you or a specialist. Self-care and respect for one's own needs play an important part in daily happiness and fulfillment, which improves many areas of your life, even turning your nightmares away, which guarantees you a better night's sleep.


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