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Toothache: what to do?

Toothache: what to do?

Just like any mouth trauma, you should consult your dentist immediately to find out if a treatment is needed. The dentist will examine the affected area and may do an x-ray. If the pain is caused by a fractured, cracked or chipped tooth, you can take a simple analgesic. If possible, store the fractured part of the tooth and take it to your dentist. If a tooth is completely torn out of the mouth due to trauma, take it to your dentist as soon as possible. It may be possible to put your tooth back in your mouth, a procedure called reimplantation.

As a dentist treats a:

Chipped tooth - If you do not feel pain and the flake is small, it is up to you to decide when and how the tooth should be treated. Depending on the size of the splinter, it can be smoothed or corrected cosmetically. Other options may be the use of facets, crowns and restorations. Ask your dentist to explain about each of them. If a restoration or artificial tooth is chipped, it should be replaced.

Fractured or cracked tooth - Fractured or cracked teeth should be restored as soon as possible to avoid further damage. A canal treatment or extraction of the tooth may be necessary. If the fracture reaches the enamel and dentin of the tooth, a crown is usually the best treatment. Remember that fractures are not always visible, even by x-rays. The symptoms can be pain during chewing and sensitivity to cold foods and beverages, in some cases even hot drinks as well as air, and these symptoms may intensify with time.

Teeth plucked out of the mouth - The key to success in replacing a tooth is to reimplant it where it left off as fast as possible. With each passing minute, more cells from the tooth root will die. If possible, wash the tooth with water only, then reinsert it in place, and rush to the dentist immediately. The tooth should be held by the crown only, and should not be dried. The success of the reimplantation is greater during the first 30 minutes, with good chances still up to two hours after the trauma. It may be necessary for your dentist to have a canal treatment one or two weeks after the tooth has stabilized.

Teeth irreparably lost, ie by a dentist's extraction or accidentally torn away, should be replaced. This avoids problems such as difficulty in chewing and speech, altered position between remaining teeth, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction caused by mastication on the side where there are more teeth, and weakening of the jaw. The options for replacing teeth can be fixed prostheses, removable prostheses, and implants.

Broken jaw - If you suspect that you or anyone else has a broken jaw, do not move it. The jaw should be held in position with a handkerchief, tie or towel tied around the chin and over the head. Cold compresses should be used to reduce swelling, if any. Go to the emergency room immediately and call your dentist.


Rheumatoid arthritis and risk of periodontal disease

Rheumatoid arthritis and risk of periodontal disease

Are people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at increased risk for periodontal disease because their limited mobility affects how they clean and care for their teeth? Or is there a basic link between the two conditions? This is what German researchers have examined in a small study published in a recent issue of the Journal of Periodontology .

(Health)

Study shows that viruses are more dangerous in the morning when the biological clock is more vulnerable

Study shows that viruses are more dangerous in the morning when the biological clock is more vulnerable

In the study, mice were infected with the influenza virus, responsible for the flu, and also with the influenza virus. herpes virus. The two viruses used in the research were very different, one era of DNA and another RNA, this generated concern for the researchers, as this increases the number of viruses.

(Health)