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WHO warns on new ways to treat sexually transmitted infections

WHO warns on new ways to treat sexually transmitted infections

Chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis, which are often treated with drugs, are becoming increasingly difficult to treat combat. This is because of the undue or excessive use of antibiotics, which causes them to lose their efficacy.

The document also points out that gonorrhea is the most complicated and the strains of its bacteria are multiresistant, not reacting to any existing antibiotics . Bacteria that cause syphilis and chlamydia are also resistant, all three being "major public health problems worldwide that affect the quality of life of millions of people and cause disease and even death," said the director. of WHO's Department of Reproductive Health, Ian Askew

WHO data estimates that 131 million people get chlamydia every year, 78 million contract gonorrhea, and 5.6 million get syphilis. Askew points out that "WHO reiterates the need to treat STIs with appropriate medicines at the right doses and at the right time to reduce their spread and improve sexual and reproductive health." are not diagnosed or treated, "can lead to serious complications and long-term health problems for women, such as pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy and abortion." The WHO also concludes that syphilis and chlamydia can cause infertility in both men and women and that such diseases can double or triple the risk of a person getting HIV.


Maluf is hospitalized in Brasília hospital: understand table

Maluf is hospitalized in Brasília hospital: understand table

According to the hospital bulletin, the deputy came in with "severe pain that began in the lower back, radiated to the lower right leg, worsened in recent weeks and in recent days, making it difficult to walk and standing posture. " Following a resonance, the parliamentarian was diagnosed with canal stenosis, with compression of the nerve structures in the region of the L3 / L4 and L4 / L5 vertebrae.

(Health)

A new way to treat tooth pain?

A new way to treat tooth pain?

The release of endorphins produces a condition commonly known as runner's high. Now, researchers at the University of Michigan are questioning whether the same mechanism could be used to help with toothache. Endorphin is a substance released in the brain when an injury occurs, nullifying any pain sensation.

(Health)